Reflection: St. Eugene, 2019

“We’re selling an opportunity to understand our history, to know our people and to share our vision of turning a 60-year nightmare around. We’re creating new memories for our children.” – Ktunaxa Chief Sophie Pierre St. Eugene is a former Indian Residential School, which has been made over into a resort, complete with casino and…

A Gorgeous Sort of Peril: Richard Lemm’s ‘Jeopardy’

Canada is rich with poets. Along our Starboard side, I can think of none finer than UPEI’s Richard Lemm. His latest offering, ‘Jeopardy’ (Acorn Press), reveals a poet philosopher in full command of his voice, drawing upon the evidence of the living world in order to inspire the reader, and make the most compelling of…

The Silence Between Two Rivers

I call myself the Silence Between Two Rivers because I inherit two large streams of humanity. The stories of our interconnections are not well told, for the most part. And the pressure to choose one side or another of my identity is real. And tedious. And not nearly as interesting to me as the territory in between.

A Constellation of Support

Today seems a good day to post this little article from 2015. A Constellation of Support  It was a rare pleasure to meet the various people I interviewed for this, and I came away feeling uplifted. The thing is, nobody does anything in this world without support, whether we see and acknowledge it or not….

For the Changing Moon: thoughts on Poems&Songs

My new book is out. The official launch happens Wednesday, October 24th, 7 PM at Audrey’s Books, with special guests, Edmonton’s own Spoken Word Youth Choir, under the direction of the fabulous Gail Sobat. If you’re in our town, come on down. This is book number two, yes, only number two. The long years of…

Heart Throb

We are all children of the drum. Life begins and ends to that primal one-two heartbeat, and drums have always been the most powerful of the instruments. We don’t always know that, though, don’t always consciously recognise it, any more, i suppose, than we recognise our own heart beating most of the time. It comes…

Bake Bread, Make Friends – article up at New Trail magazine

This summer, I had the delightful task of researching and writing a little article for my alma mater,  University of Alberta. It’s the home page opener at their site, and I couldn’t be more chuffed. Our Daily Bread Now, I’m off to bake bread.

Life + 70

So, the word in trade negotiations today is that the new agreement for North America, whatever else it may entail, affirms copyright as extending for the life of the author, plus 70 years. Life + 70   I find myself wondering what that means for Indigenous communities, where the concepts of copyright are stringent in their…

A Table, A Room, A Coffee, A Cat: How the Writing Half Lives

We all know the two stereotypes of how writers live: starving in a Dickensian garret, or swanning about in a mansion, courted by the power elites. However, in Canada, in 2018, how do real writers really live? What’s ‘home’ for us? What follows is an extremely non-exhaustive exploration: I asked some working writers. Their answers…

terrible words

Originally posted on Why the 3E Senate is a Silly Idea:
The photo above was taken by paleoartist Emily Willoughby in 2015. It shows Harvard fossil MCZ 4371, the foot of a specimen Deinonychus. Go check out her website of paleoart here. I was a fairly typical kid of my generation; I loved to read about…

Coming to Canada: A Gardener’s Meditation, Part 1

A garden is a long work. Yes, you can turn soil, plant seeds, harvest in that same fall. In that sense, to grow a garden is a simple task, unskilled labour; weed a little, watch the water, wait on the season, and done. Gardening, though, is more than this. It is the communion of human…